Subject Verb Agreement With Most Of

Article 6. In sentences that begin here or there, the real subject follows the verb. The problem with grammar rules, from the point of view of modern linguistics, is that many rules are not absolute. There are many exceptions to the rules, as we can see here. It may be useful to mark compressed lists of rules like these as bookmarks. The New Fowler`s Modern English Usage edited by R.W. Burchfield. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. 1996.

Is used with permission from Oxford University Press. S. 242. Article 2. Two distinct subjects that are linked by or, or, either by a singular verb. 1. Subjects and verbs must match in numbers. It is the angle rule that forms the background of the concept. Expressions of rupture like half, part of, a percentage of, the majority of are sometimes singular and sometimes plural, depending on the meaning. (The same is true, of course, when all, all, more, most and some act as subjects.) The totals and products of mathematical processes are expressed in singular and require singular verbs. The phrase “more than one” (weirdly) takes on a singular verb: “More than one student has tried to do so.” Use a singular verb with a singular or a non-count clause: In the example above, the plural verb corresponds to the actors of the subject. In this small garage, most of their music has been put on over time.

(It had to be “was”?) 9. If subjects are related to both singular and the words “or,” “nor,” “neither/nor,” “either/or” or “not only/but also,” the verb is singular. Would you say, for example, “You`re having fun” or “having fun”? As “she” is plural, you would opt for the plural form of the verb “are.” Ready to dive into a world where subjects and verbs live in harmony? In informal writing, neither take a plural verb, so these pronouns are followed by a prepositionphrase that begins with. This is especially true for interrogation constructions: “Did two clowns read the mission?” “You`re taking this seriously?” Burchfield calls it “a conflict between the fictitious agreement and the actual agreement.” Most of their music was deposited (substantial) most of the house was lase in yellow (singular countable subprov) most of his songs were recorded (countable noun pluralist) In recent years, the test service of the SAT did not consider any as strictly singular. However, according to Merriam-Webster dictionary of English Usage: “Of course, none is as singular as plural since old English and it still is. The idea that it is unique is a myth of unknown origin that seems to have emerged in the 19th century. If this appears to you as a singular in the context, use a singular verb; If it appears as a plural, use a plural verb. Both are acceptable beyond serious criticism. If there is no clear intention that this means “not one,” a singular verb follows.

Article 3. The verb in either or either, or neither or the sentence is not closest to the name or pronoun. What would a grammar lesson be without a few exceptions to the rule? Let`s look at some of the most notable exceptions: Some indeterminate pronouns are particularly annoying Everyone (listed above, too) certainly feel like more than one person and therefore students are sometimes tempted to use a plural with them. But they`re still unique. Everyone often follows a prepositionphrase that ends with a majority word (each of the cars), which confuses the verb code. Similarly, everyone is always singular and requires a singular verb. 2. The subordinate clauses that come between the subject and the verb have no influence on their agreement. 10.

The only time the object of the preposition decides pluralistic or singular verbs is when nomic and pronoun themes such as “some,” “mi,” “mi,” “none,” “no” or “all” are followed by prepositionphrase.